Overseas Travel Immunizations

Traveling overseas? Be prepared! Healthtech provides vaccinations and medications which can afford excellent protection against a range of diseases found in many foreign countries. This program could mean the difference between an enjoyable trip and an unpleasant one!

  • Overseas travel immunizations are administered at our facility.
  • Healthtech's travel advice nurse reviews each traveler's trip details to determine which immunizations to recommend.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website is used as a reference for the most up-to-date travel recommendations and requirements.
  • Healthtech uses a recall program for persons who require follow-up.
We can provide the following immunizations:
 
  Hepatitis B Influenza
  Hepatitis A Polio
  Typhoid Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)
  Yellow Fever Td/Tdap (Tetanus Diphtheria/Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis)

Hepatitis B:

Hepatitis B is a viral disease of the liver. It can result in a severe chronic condition, and in some cases, death from liver cancer or cirrhosis complications. Roughly 10% of persons infected with the hepatitis B virus develop a chronic, life-long infection. Since this disease is highly contagious, many persons that are infected, but for a while, symptom-free, will infect others. Due to government-controlled immunization programs the number of persons yearly infected in the United States has dropped from over 200,000 to 70,000. Healthcare workers, firefighters, police, emergency service personnel, dentists and their staff, and others that may come in contact with blood and other body fluids, are especially at risk. Healthtech has extensive experience in providing hepatitis B vaccinations.

Click here for CDC's Vaccination Information Statement (VIS):
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-hep-b.pdf

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Hepatitis A:

Hepatitis A is a viral disease of the liver affecting at least 35,000 people each year in the United States. Although not as serious as the other hepatitis viruses, hepatitis A infection results in loss of time at school and work. Children seldom experience severe symptoms while adults may suffer bothersome complications. The Hepatitis A vaccine is highly effective and gives long lasting protection.

Click here for CDC's Vaccination Information Statement (VIS):
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-hep-a.pdf

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Typhoid:

Typhoid fever is a debilitating disease caused by a salmonella bacteria. The symptoms include headache, fatigue, fever, stomach pains, weakness and loss of appetite. A rash sometimes develops. If not treated, as many as 30% may die from this disease. While not very common in the United States, typhoid infects over 20 million people a year around the world and kills about 200,000. Typhoid vaccine, while not routinely used in the United States, is recommended for persons traveling to parts of the world where typhoid is common.

Click here for CDC's Vaccination Information Statement (VIS):
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-typhoid.pdf

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Yellow Fever:

Yellow fever is caused by a virus which is transmitted to persons through a mosquito bite. The first symptoms are fever, headache and muscle aches. These symptoms usually persist only a few days. Some persons recover at this time, but others then experience high fevers, nausea, vomiting, jaundice and bleeding from multiple body sights. Those with the more serious symptoms have an almost 50% chance of dying. Overseas travelers to countries with infected areas are encouraged to receive the yellow fever vaccine to prevent this serious disease.

Click here for CDC's Vaccination Information Statement (VIS):
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-yf.pdf

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Influenza:

The highly contagious disease, influenza, or "flu" causes considerable discomfort, inconvenience and loss of work time for millions of Americans. Thousands of people die from the flu each year. Although the elderly are especially vulnerable, all age groups may become infected and experience moderate to severe illness, often leading to pneumonia. Influenza vaccine is given yearly since flu viruses change significantly and the immune protection from vaccination decreases monthly. The optimum months for flu vaccination are October and November. Healthtech has implemented a highly effective flu vaccination program in which, over a span of ten years, has been responsible for over 400,000 inoculations.

To view the flu and pneumonia schedule at Raley's, Bel Air and Nob Hill please visit www.raleys.com starting mid-September.

Click here for CDC's Vaccination Information Statement (VIS):
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-flu.pdf

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Polio:

Although polio has been almost eliminated from the United States, it is still common in some parts of the world. Even though the polio virus does not cause serious illness, it can lead to arm or leg paralysis or even death. Healthcare workers treating patients who could have polio, laboratory workers who might handle polio virus, and travelers to countries where polio is common, all should receive the polio vaccine.

Click here for CDC's Vaccination Information Statement (VIS):
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-ipv.pdf

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Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR):

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) are serious viral diseases. Each one involves numerous symptoms and can even result in death. The MMR vaccine covers all of the three illnesses. Children should get two doses of the vaccine, the first at 12 - 15 months of age and the second at 4 - 6 years of age. Adults born after 1956 should get at least one dose of the MMR vaccine unless they can show they have had either the vaccines or the diseases.

Click here for CDC's Vaccination Information Statement (VIS):
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-mmr.pdf

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Tetanus-Diphtheria or Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis (Td / Tdap):

Diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis are bacterial diseases that cause several severe health conditions. Diphtheria can lead to breathing problems, paralysis, heart failure and even death. Tetanus (lockjaw) causes tightening of muscles, usually all over the body. It may result in the jaw becoming locked so that the victim cannot open his/her mouth or swallow. Death results in up to 2 out of 10 cases. Pertussis causes coughing spells for infants so that it is hard for them to eat, drink or breathe. Serious conditions such as seizures, pneumonia, brain damage and even death may occur. The DTap vaccine is given in 5 doses to children up to 6 years of age. The Tdap vaccine is used as early as 7 years of age for children who missed one or more childhood doses of DTap. The Tdap vaccine is recommended at age 11 or 12. All adults should get a booster dose of Td (tetanus/diphtheria) every 10 years.

Click here for CDC's Vaccination Information Statement (VIS):
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/vis/downloads/vis-td-tdap.pdf

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